You know that feeling when you visit a new destination, and it’s the complete opposite of what you imagined it to be? That’s what happened to me when I arrived in Stockholm. For my whole life, I associated Sweden with minimalism and modernism thanks to IKEA and Spotify. While the semi-cashless aspect of the country is pretty “technologically advanced”, I was surprised to see so much traditional architecture. It’s definitely not the land of time machines and jetpacks that I imagined it to be.

Camera Configuration: Fujifilm X-Pro2 with a Fujinon XF 23mm f/2 WR lens.

Stockholm was the last stop on our month-long trek around Europe. Honestly, I’m looking forward to heading back home to Tokyo for some rest and relaxation. Traveling around has been fun, but I now realize we packed way too many destinations in too little time. I feel like we spent most of our time traveling to different cities instead of actually experiencing each city. Next time, I need to remember to slow down.

Rådhuset Station is the coolest subway station I’ve ever seen. The exposed reddish-brown bedrock really gives off some dystopian vibes. This style of design is called “organic architecture”, and it’s based on natural cave systems. In other words, this is what a subway stop in Star Wars would look like.

Europe is filled with cathedrals, and it turns out Stockholm has a pretty nice one. Stockholm Cathedral (Storkyrkan) is a medieval cathedral that was built in 1279. Nowadays, it’s often used for royal coronations, weddings, and funerals.